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Mexican Cauliflower “Rice”

Mexican Cauliflower Rice

After the last recipe that I posted, which is quite possible the world’s most decadent vegan cake, I figured I was due to post something a little more healthy.  This mexican cauliflower “rice” is one of our newest favorites! It’s so easy and loaded with vegetables.  It’s very low in calories but tastes like a splurge.

Rice is one of the top four FPIES allergens, so it is avoided by most kiddos with FPIES, including E.  However, cauliflower tends to have a pretty high success rate (according to the results of a survey conducted by an FPIES parent).  Apparently cauliflower is also high in vitamin C and folate and there are a lot websites that state that it helps prevent cancer (I didn’t take the time to verify these claims).   I think of cauliflower as a basic vegetable staple that is great cooked or raw.  It’s also very low in calories – a cup of cauliflower is only 27 calories (a cup of white rice is almost 8 times that!).  So it seemed to be a good vegetable to add to E’s diet this summer.  I am happy to report that he easily and enthusiastically passed a cauliflower food trial and cauliflower has been a welcome addition to his diet.

Given our success with cauliflower I was excited to try some of the recipes that I’ve come across that use it as a rice-alternative.  It’s always nice to have a new dish for E and even better when it’s suitable to serve as part of a family dinner.  I have to admit that I was skeptical at first, could a vegetable really replace a starch?  The surprising answer is – yes!  I’ll admit that the “rice” is a little more crunchy but the dish is so flavorful!   The best compliment came from my brother-in-law who several hours after dinner said, “wait, there wasn’t any rice in that?”  It really is that good!

It’s actually pretty easy to turn cauliflower into “rice” if you have a food processor but it can also be done by hand.  I used the tutorial on the In Sonnet’s Kitchen blog, but it’s basically just a matter of grating cauliflower.  One thing I would add is to hold the cauliflower perpendicular to the grater, otherwise you’ll get some longer “grains of rice,” which isn’t the end of the world, it just makes it looks less like rice.

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My cauliflower rice! (I think its pretty convincing)
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 If you look closely you notice the longer “grains”

I had a very specific goal for this recipe.  I wanted to substitute Rice-A-Roni spanish rice to be used as a side dish for a mexican fiesta.  I found a couple of recipes online that used real rice and adapted it for the cauliflower.  This recipe calls for about 6 cups, which is about what you get from a medium head of cauliflower.  The recipe is pretty forgiving, though, so don’t feel like you have to use exactly 6 cups.  I decided to go with a vegan option here and use vegetable stock, however I have also made it using chicken and beef stock.  I didn’t notice a huge difference in taste between the three.  I like Kitchen Basics stock because they have an allergen statement on their box (I love it when a company is aware of the difficulties we face) and they are really helpful when you call to ask about their ingredients.  They are also available by phone until 8:00pm so you can talk to a real person when you glance at the box the second before you add it to a dinner recipe at 5:05pm and realize that the ingredients on the box changed since the last time you used it – not that that’s ever happened to me :).  You can probably make the “rice” a little softer (and more rice-like) by cooking it longer, but I’m generally too impatient and don’t mind the slightly different texture.   You can also change the level of spicy heat by adding diced tomatoes with jalapeños instead of mild chilies and changing the amount of chili powder.  I love a versatile recipe!

Mexican Cauliflower “Rice” (dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free, grain-free)

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 minced garlic cloves
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 cups cauliflower “rice” (see link above)
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • salt to taste (about 1 tsp, depending on how salty the stock is)
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes with green chilies
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • one bunch scallions, sliced

Directions

Heat oil in a large skillet.  Add onions and garlic and sauté until just soft and fragrant, about 3 minutes.

Add the cauliflower to the skillet and stir to distribute the onion and garlic through the cauliflower.

Add the chili powder, oregano, cumin, and salt, stirring well between each one.

Add the tomatoes and stock, stir well.

Bring to a low boil, cover and let simmer until desired tenderness (about 10 -15 minutes).

Remove from heat and stir in the scallions (or use a garnish sprinkled on top).

Enjoy!

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The two recipes I used for inspiration are from Sweet C Designs and Cherished Bliss.
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0

Veggie Bites – A Great Way to Sneak in Some Calcium & Veggies!

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I realize that most of the recipes I have posted are of desserts and sweet treats.  I don’t necessarily hear anyone complaining (who doesn’t love cookies and candy?) but I want to assure you that there is also some healthier cooking taking place at our house.

A couple of months ago I learned that E’s Neocate wasn’t covering his daily recommended dose of calcium so I started to look for creative ways to incorporate more calcium into his diet, which is difficult when you are avoiding all dairy products.  E’s dietician recommended we try salmon and green leafy vegetables, like kale and spinach.   I came across a recipe for spinach bites that sounded great.  Unfortunately they didn’t turn out right for me so I tweaked it a little and made my own version.

I love these Veggie Bites and so does E!  I usually make them with spinach but I have also had success with broccoli and I’m guessing you could use just about anything. Not only are they a good way to sneak some veggies into my little guy, but they were also a good way to transition him to more flavorful food.  I have a tendency to get caught up in pure food trials, during which I try not to add too many variables, like spices.  This was a good opportunity to trial a bunch of spices that were likely going to be passes.   It also contains three chia “eggs,” which helps boost the fiber, calcium, and omega-3.

I won’t lie – they are a little bit time-consuming to make and I always end up with a sink full of dirty dishes, but they are totally worth it.  Besides all the nutritional benefits, they are a great make-ahead dish.  This recipe makes about 12 good-sized servings, so I usually freeze about half of the try.  If you pre-cut them, you can just pull them out of the freezer and defrost/reheat as needed.  I love having them on hand for use as a side dish whenever I need them. I think they would also work well as a quick, healthy snack.

I usually just cut them into square or strips to serve but I’ve been wanting to try to make them a little more fun, so today I pulled out the cookie cutters.  I recommend letting them cool completely before your try cutting them, or you’re likely to get more of a veggie mush (which still tastes delicious).  If you are feeling creative and want to use cookie cutters, refrigerating them overnight will help you get a more workable consistency.  I hope you enjoy them as much as we do!

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Spinach Bites (egg free, grain free, dairy free, soy free)

Ingredients: 

4 Russett or White potatoes

1 8oz package frozen chopped spinach

3 chia seed “eggs” (3 tbsp ground chia seed + 9 tbsp water)

½ tsp onion powder

½ tbsp garlic powder

½ tbsp Italian seasoning

¼ tsp pepper

¼ tsp sea salt

2 Tbsp Canola oil

Directions:

Pre-heat your oven to 350°F.

Peel and cut the potatoes into small pieces.  Boil with a dash of salt until they are soft.

Steam or lightly cook your spinach.  Drain any extra liquid.

Mash the potatoes.

Blend the spinach until creamy.

Mix the spinach with potatoes.  I use an immersion blender for the mashing and blending, this results in a creamy, well-incorporated mixture (and cuts down on the dishes).

Make your chia egg: mix the ground chia with water and let sit to gel while you prepare the rest of the recipe.

Add the spices and oil to the potato/spinach mixture.

Stir well.

Fold in the chia eggs and stir until well combined.

Spray a 13×9 glass baking dish with olive oil (or other cooking spray).

Pour the mixture into the prepared dish.  Make sure you spread it out so that it’s flat and even in the dish, It won’t settle at all in the oven.

Bake at 350º for 40 minutes.

Let cool (refrigerate for a couple of hours if you have time), cut (into fun shapes if you want) and serve!

Enjoy!

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This recipe was adapted from the one I found here: For the Love of Food!
8

Out of the Blue – Acute FPIES Reactions!

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After we eliminated grains from E’s diet (along with dairy and soy) things were great!  He had stopped vomiting, was gaining lots of weight (maybe too much), was sleeping well, and we were successfully introducing fruits, vegetables, legumes, and even meats.  The three of us had made it to his first birthday and celebrated with a big Curious George-inspired party and a safe cake made of coconut flour and lots of eggs.  Life was predictable, which is just the way I like it.  We were settling into a nice routine and starting to relax a little.

After the party we had a ton of bananas (I used bunches of bananas to anchor balloons for the centerpieces on the tables).  As they started to turn brown it occurred to me that I could turn them into coconut flour banana bread.    I found a recipe that contained a couple of new foods but I decided to make it anyway, with the intention of freezing it for when we were ready to do a trial. So I made two loaves.  They were just ok, but E wouldn’t know how good it could be so I hoped he would think they were delicious (I use this line of reasoning way too often).

Meanwhile, our allergist had given us the ok to start trying wheat.  About a week after his birthday, I gave him one piece of whole wheat rotini with his breakfast.  We didn’t notice any problems but wanted to take this trial nice and slow so the next morning I also gave him one piece of rotini with his breakfast.  We had a normal morning, he took a normal morning nap, and when he woke up it was time for lunch.  I can’t remember the circumstances but for some reason I didn’t have enough food to give him for lunch.  He ate some prepackaged diced mangoes and I felt like he should have something else.  I didn’t have anything to give him…except for the banana bread.  The new foods were unlikely to be allergens and it was right there, so I figured a small taste wouldn’t hurt.  Interestingly, E didn’t want to eat it.  I was perplexed.  How could he not be interested in a sweet, cake-like version of bananas? I practically forced him to eat a few bites, thinking that he was just thrown off by a new texture.  It was clear that he wasn’t enjoying it, so I cleaned up and moved on with our afternoon.  I had a big outing planned for that day – we were going to buy him his first real pair of sneakers and make quick stop at Whole Foods.

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How cool are those shoes?

I loaded him into the car and we were off to the children’s shoe store.  He was great and we scored an awesome pair of yellow Adidas that were on clearance.  Next was Whole Foods for some E-safe foods.  Honestly, it was a fairly big outing for us.  We still weren’t getting out much, so two stops in one window of wakefulness was pushing it.  By the end of the shopping trip I knew I was approaching nap time, so I was preoccupied with getting him into the car and getting home before he passed out in the car and all chances of a real nap were destroyed.  As I lifted him into the carseat, he spit up a little.  This was weird, I couldn’t remember the last time he had spit up. But it was just a tiny bit, it was actually more like bad reflux.  So I strapped him in and started the car.  We were barely out of the parking space and he really threw up.  I pulled into another space and got out of the car to check on him.  He seemed fine (except for the vomit on his shirt).  I was a bit concerned, this was unusual.  But now I really wanted to get home so I wiped him up and left the parking lot.

We made it to the first major intersection.  I was waiting for the green arrow to make a left turn, was the first car at the light with a growing line of cars behind me, and E threw up again.  And he started choking.  I couldn’t tell if he was having trouble breathing or not.  I pulled over as soon as I could.  I turned around to look at him and determined that his breathing was fine.  The carseat was at an angle that I think prevented him from getting the vomit out.  He was choking on his own vomit.  This was really sad and upsetting, but not as upsetting as the thought of his throat closing. He seemed ok so I kept driving.  He threw up again.  And now I was driving through a farm! The road was narrow, there was no place to pull over, and there were a bunch of cars behind me.  I was panicking.  When I finally pulled over, he had stopped vomiting and seemed ok.  I was really shaken up.  I tried taking some deep breaths and wrap my head around what was going on.  I was pretty sure this was an allergic reaction.  Did I need to use the epi-pen? What was he reacting too? Should I go the hospital?  It was all so stressful for me but E handled it like a champ.  He didn’t seem to be very distressed and wasn’t struggling to breathe so I decided to continue home, where I could safely get him out of the car and better assess the situation.

We finally made it home.  As I pulled into the driveway he started vomiting again.  This time I was able to get to him fast enough, rip him out of his carseat and stood in the driveway holding him so that he could get all of the vomit out and know that I was there for him.  It had been a while since I held my baby close while he puked all over both of us. It wasn’t necessarily something I had missed but I so relieved to have him in my arms that I didn’t even care.  He was relatively calm but really sleepy.  I was a mess – emotionally and physically.

I took E inside, stripped the pukey clothes off of him and noticed that his eczema was flaring.  By this point it was quite clear to me that this was reaction.  He had stopped vomiting and was breathing ok, so I didn’t think I needed to use the epi-pen, but I did give him a dose of Benadryl, put fresh clothes on him, and put him down for his nap.  He fell asleep right away.   Then I got changed, cleaned the carseat, left a message for the allergist, and tried to process what had just happened (all while staring at him on the video monitor to make sure he remained ok).

What was the cause of the reaction? We were in the middle of a wheat trial, but it had been about 6 hours since he had wheat.  And it was the same dose as yesterday – he hadn’t had any problems yesterday.  Could it be a reaction so long after the exposure?  Then there was the banana bread.  I went back to the recipe: coconut flour, bananas, eggs, Earth Balance, honey, sea salt, cinnamon, baking soda, and vanilla.  The only new things were cinnamon and honey.  Everything else had been passed in 4-7 day food trials.  When the allergist’s nurse returned my call it was decided that it must have been a delayed reaction to the wheat.  The likelihood of reactions to cinnamon or honey were low.  We also knew that he had trouble with other grains so there was a higher likelihood that all grains were going to be triggers (105).  She was also a little suspect of the coconut flour (despite the fact that he had coconut milk and coconut flour many times with no problems) so she recommended holding off on all grains for a while and doing a separate trial of coconut just to be sure.

I wasn’t completely satisfied with this answer.  It didn’t make sense that the reaction was so long after the wheat.  I remembered back to his last skin prick tests and a very small reaction to egg.  It was so small that it wasn’t considered positive, but it was enough for the nurse to mention it.  Could he be allergic to eggs even after eating them in his birthday cake?  Or was it something else?  Maybe he had been exposed to something else while we were at the shoe store or Whole Foods.  I just didn’t know.  I was still shaken up from the drive home and I continued to beat myself up for confounding the wheat trial.  I was also sad that wheat was off the table for a while.  But E woke up from his nap as though nothing had happened.  He seemed fine and we moved on, avoiding wheat and coconut.

A couple of weeks later we started an almond trial using almond milk.  E was doing great.  He drank the almond milk with no problems and showed no sign of a reaction.  Over about 5 days we worked up to replacing one of his formula cups with almond milk, which was about 6 ounces.  I wanted to give him more but didn’t want him to miss out on the nutrients in the formula and didn’t think he would drink much more milk on top of the formula.  So I decided to add almond flour to the trial.  When I had been searching for coconut flour banana bread, I had found a couple of recipes for almond flour banana bread so I decided to try one.  The taste and texture were much better than the coconut flour version so Jonathan and I were really excited at the prospect of a better grain-free flour.

However, E was not impressed.  I gave him the banana bread and almond milk for breakfast on a Sunday morning.  He played with the bread, put some in his mouth, and spit it out.  Weird.  I thought for sure he would love it.  Maybe he remembered that the last time he had banana bread he got sick? It seemed unlikely, he had gotten sick hours after eating the bread.  Maybe he just didn’t like his bananas in bread form.  It didn’t really matter.  I needed him to eat it so I could move on with the trial.  I also didn’t have a lot of time to spend on breakfast because we were going to a family reunion picnic that day and needed to finish getting ready and get into the car.  I practically shoved it down his throat.  We cleaned up from breakfast, dressed him in an adorable little outfit and strapped him into the car around nap time so that he could sleep on the way to the picnic.

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My wonderful husband even took the time to iron E’s tiny shirt for the picnic.

He surprised us by waking from his nap early and unhappily.  We had just gotten off of the highway and were about 10 minutes from the picnic when the vomit started.  It was a little bit of de ja vu, but this time wasn’t as bad – mostly because there were two of us and I wasn’t driving.  Jonathan was able to quickly pull into a parking lot and we got to him much faster than the time before.  His breakfast hadn’t included diced fruit so he didn’t seem to have as much trouble getting the vomit out (it was actually quite projectile) and so there wasn’t any choking.  He seemed fine after he threw up.  Luckily, we were still in the habit of traveling with an extra set of clothes for E.  Unfortunately the backup outfit wasn’t as fashionable and I wasn’t as prepared – my white shirt now had some unintentional “decoration.”  Jonathan and I were pretty shaken up by the time we got to the picnic but E acted like nothing had happened.  His eczema flared again so we gave him some Benadryl and tried to go about our day.

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E had a blast while we did our best to clean his carseat with baby wipes.  
Does this look like a little boy who just coated the backseat in vomit?

I tried my best to enjoy the picnic but I was already playing detective.  Maybe it wasn’t a reaction.  Maybe he was carsick.  That didn’t make sense though, we had taken other, longer car trips without any problems.  The vomiting and the eczema, along with the timing (about 2 1/2 hours after eating) indicated a reaction, but to what?.  Was it an almond fail? Was it something else?  Cooked bananas were a common denominator between this time and last time, but he ate a raw banana almost every day with no problem.  It would be almost unheard of for a cooked food to  cause a problem when a raw food didn’t (though it is not as unusual for it to be the other way around).  I went back to the recipe.  There were other similarities: eggs, baking soda, Earth Balance, sea salt, and vanilla.  I substituted the honey for sugar this time since I still wasn’t positive that the honey hadn’t been a problem last time.  All of the ingredients were in his birthday cake that he had enjoyed without any problems.  Ugh.  It was looking like an almond fail.  But again my gut said maybe it’s the eggs…

When I spoke to E’s allergist the next day, she wasn’t convinced it was the almonds either.  She thought that it was more likely that he was reacting to eggs on both occasions.  It was significant to her that he didn’t want to eat either version of banana bread.  She said that kids who are allergic to eggs tend to reject them.  This can happen with all food but her experience had demonstrated that it was almost always the case with eggs.  They were a common denominator in both banana breads and the most likely allergen in both.  She didn’t know why he had done ok with his birthday cake trial but said that sometimes it takes several exposures before a reaction occurs.  I had already been thinking it could be the eggs so I was glad we were on the same page.

We went back to the drawing board.  We did pure food trials of wheat and almonds, which E passed beautifully.  Much to my surprise he failed the controlled trial of coconut milk.  It didn’t make sense because he had been exposed to coconut on multiple occasions with no sign of reaction.  But the fail was clear.  I gave him a cup of coconut milk in the morning and he wasn’t interested.  He managed to drink maybe an ounce before he pushed it away.  When I gave it back to him he tried to hide it.  He was clearly not going to drink it.  By this point I knew that he somehow knows something we don’t when it comes to his allergens, so I didn’t push it.  About 2 1/2 hours later he was vomiting.

So within about two months E had his first three acute FPIES reactions.  Completely out of the blue and to foods that we considered to be safe.  These reactions were a game changer to me.  They were terrifying and they made us question everything we thought we knew.  I later learned that they were pretty much “classic” FPIES reactions, which typically occur 1-3 hours after ingesting the food and consist of profuse vomiting that is sometimes followed by lethargy and ashen color.  Sometimes diarrhea occurs within 2-10 hours (4, 111).  Like E, most children recover fairly quickly, within a couple of hours of the reaction.  However, up to 20% of reactions lead to shock that requires IV fluids (111).  Epinephrine and antihistamines are not generally helpful for FPIES reactions (111), so I don’t give him Benadryl anymore.  I learned some other important lessons: FPIES is completely unpredictable, reactions hit when you least expect them, it is possible to react to food after a number of exposures, food trials had to be treated like controlled experiments, and that I hope I never have to deal with an anaphylactic reaction (the FPIES ones are scary enough, thank you).  Most importantly, these reactions removed any doubt that E had FPIES.  And the list of allergens was getting longer…

 

1

Hooray for a Successful Easter (and Peanut Butter Eggs)!

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This weekend was crazy-busy for us and I’m exhausted.  But every last detail was worthwhile! I am so excited and can’t wait to tell you about how well everything went!

This year we hosted Easter for the first time, which was an honor and a little stressful.  My great-aunt has hosted  an Easter open house for nearly 60 years but was unable to do it this year, so I offered to have her traditional party at our house.  This was great because it gave me some control over the menu and we had all of E’s toys which were great distractions from all the food (it also gave me a good reason to do some intense spring cleaning).  We stuck pretty much with the traditional menu – kielbasa, ham, potato salad, and pasta salad.  There were some allergens on the menu but we decided not to mess too much with tradition.  We felt confident that we would be able to keep E away from those foods and decided to make a special meal for him.  It turns out that he doesn’t really care if he’s eating what everyone else is eating, as long as he’s eating when everyone else is eating.  I tend to get caught up with making a safe version of the traditional holiday meal for E, which causes me more stress and then he may or may not even eat it.  Luckily my husband was able to step in and prevent me from embarking on crazy recipes or rushed food trials this time.  We decided to keep it simple and went with tried and true favorites.  After all, what toddler wouldn’t be thrilled with an Easter hot dog?  

However, as you may recall, I was determined that we were going to pass down some Easter traditions.  Last Easter E was only about 7 months old and we were still dealing with the end of chronic FPIES so we weren’t feeling up to dyeing eggs.  I was a little torn about it this year too.  I figured it could either way – he could totally love it or not be interested and make a huge mess.  And then there are the eggs – one of E’s allergens.  Dyeing eggs doesn’t really require eating the eggs, but the kid still puts everything in his mouth!  And what was I going to do with a bunch of hardboiled eggs? Eggs were fairly easy for us to eliminate from the house after we found out E was allergic – my husband and I never ate a ton of eggs so it wasn’t hard to just not have them.  I didn’t need to start now.  I wondered if I could find something else to dye, so I started scouring the internet.  I found a company that makes ceramic dyeable eggs, but they were a little expensive and I was afraid they were too fragile to give a one-year-old who doesn’t have a gentle bone in his body.

I was ready to give up when a friend and fellow FPIES mom told me about plastic dyeable eggs that Walmart was selling.  I was so excited – completely allergy-safe and rough-little-boy-friendly.  It’s like they were made for E!  I will generally go out of my way to avoid Walmart, but I’ll do anything for my son, so off to Walmart I went.

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We finally got around to dying the eggs on Saturday afternoon and it was a blast!  E loved it!  I also think I will seriously consider using plastic eggs forever.  He was able to throw the eggs into the dye cup, smash them down with egg holder, and drop them on the floor without having to worry about any broken eggshells.  And the eggs were beautiful!  The sentimentalist in me is also excited to save one of E’s first dyed Easter eggs.

IMG_2940Next up was the Easter candy.  So after a day of cleaning, egg dyeing, last minute Easter outfit shopping, and cooking, I started to make candy.  I was glad I had done a test run of the giant chocolate bunny and smaller chocolate candies that I made out of enjoy life chocolate chips.  That was easy.  But I also decided to make allergen-free peanut butter eggs based on a recipe I came across on Pinterest.  These were fairly easy, but a bit time consuming and I started around 10pm (which is past my bedtime, I know I’m pretty lame).

The results were totally worth it! The peanut butter eggs are delicious! Seriously.  Better than than Reese’s.  There’s about 5 ingredients in them – so they are pure yumminess!  But even better than the yum-factor is the safe-factor.  E can eat them and he loves them!  I love having a safe snack for him and watching him enjoy the indulgence.  It’s also nice that I can treat myself to one without hiding in the kitchen and going through an entire decontamination procedure afterward.

On Easter morning, the Easter Bunny left a basket that contained the safe chocolate bunny, a few smaller chocolates and two peanut butter eggs, along with a Curious George lunchbox, safe crayons, a new book, and a couple small toy cars.  E loves cars and Curious George, so I didn’t know which was going to be the bigger hit in the basket.  Turns out it was the peanut butter eggs!  He didn’t even hesitate – he grabbed one and took a bite as soon as he saw them! I thought my heart was going to burst with pride, love, and joy!  He was so excited and happy to see a candy that he could eat.  I loved that he loved them!

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He didn’t waste any time digging into the candy!

We set out some small chocolates and peanut butter eggs on the coffee table when our guests arrived.  Everyone raved about them.  I love finding things that are safe for E that other people can also enjoy.  It was also so exciting that E could walk up to the coffee table and indulge in a little treat.  I guess it’s a feeling only an allergy-parent can understand.  I spend so much of my time anxious about E being exposed to allergens and preventing him from eating things that other people take for granted.  Being able sit back and relax as I was watching him enjoy a safe treat was the best Easter gift I could imagine!

We had a wonderful Easter surrounded by family and sharing traditions with our little boy.    I hope you also had a wonderful and safe Easter! I know that it’s a bit late, but below is the adapted recipe for safe peanut butter eggs.  I will definitely be making these year-round (maybe as just balls or other shapes if I’m feeling really ambitious) and I hope you enjoy them too!

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In all of the craziness of this weekend I forgot to get a picture of just the peanut butter eggs.

Peanut-Butter Eggs: Dairy-Free, Soy-Free, Egg-Free, Grain-Free

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Peanut Butter (I used Crazy Richard’s 100% Natural Creamy Peanut Butter – I’d assume you could use any safe nut/seed butter)
  • 1/4 cup Soy-Free Earth Balance Natural Buttery Spread
  • 1 tsp Vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cup Powdered Sugar
  • 10 oz package Enjoy Life Mini Chips
  • 1 tbsp canola oil (or other safe oil)

Directions:

  1. Melt peanut butter and Earth Balance for 1 minute in microwave.
  2. Stir until blended.
  3. Add vanilla and powdered sugar and mix well.
  4. Scoop out about a tablespoon of the mixture and shape into an egg shape.
  5. Place on parchment paper lined sheet and place in freezer for 15 minutes.
  6. Mix the mini chips with canola oil.
  7. Melt the mini chips in microwave by heating for 30 seconds then stirring and repeating process until it is melted and smooth. (This should take about 1 1/2 minutes)
  8. Using a fork, dip egg into chocolate and flip to cover completely. Lift with fork and gently tap on edge of the bowl allowing excess chocolate to drip off.
  9. Place back on parchment paper.
  10. Refrigerate 10 minutes until chocolate has set

If you have the freezer space, I recommend freezing in two batches. This will allow you to get started with the freezing process while you shape the remainder.  It will also keep half frozen while you are dipping the other half in chocolate, which is easier to do when they are more solid.

The original recipe is here: http://www.raininghotcoupons.com/chocolate-covered-peanut-butter-eggs/.  I removed the allergens and also made them much smaller.  
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Our beautiful dyed plastic eggs! 
Happy Easter!
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The Easter Bunny’s Research Assistant – Chocolate Candy

Chocolate Bunny - flowers

The centerpiece of my childhood Easter baskets was always a huge chocolate bunny.  So large that it took several weeks (or at least days) to finish.  Of course now when I look back the whole thing is a little sad – slowly maiming a bunny as you ingest hundreds of calories and piles of sugar.  Nonetheless, it is tradition.  Thus, it’s important to me that E get to experience all of the joy and creepiness that comes with finding a large chocolate bunny in your basket on Easter morning and slowly gnawing on it until it disappears.

But, alas, procuring said bunny for E is a little more difficult.  It has to be free of all of his allergens – dairy, soy, egg, coconut, rice, and oats.  The Easter Bunny has to be on the ball this year.  No procrastinating and last-minute shopping trips.  This magical confection would not be on the shelf of a local grocery store.

So a couple of weeks ago I started the research.  I was pleased to find a couple of websites that sell dairy-free chocolate Easter candy, however most contained soy.  Amanda’s Own was the one exception, the problem is that we’ve never had it.  Buying this chocolate would be taking a chance and, while all of the ingredients appear to be safe (cane sugar, unsweetened chocolate, and cocoa butter), I felt like it would require at least a mini-trial to be sure.  Nobody wants the Easter Bunny to accidentally bring an FPIES reaction.

We have, however, already passed Enjoy Life Chocolate Chips, which are free of all of the top 8 allergens as well as rice, oat, and coconut.  These things are a God-send and they actually taste good!  Given that we already had some safe chocolate, it seemed logical that I should make my own bunny.  This made me incredibly uncomfortable.  I’m pretty sure my last candy-making experience was my 8th birthday party, which was held at a candy kitchen. Eight-years-old was a long time ago!  After a night of trying to convince myself that I could do this, I became empowered by a few fellow FPIES-moms on the FPIES Facebook page who assured me that making my own Easter candy was quite possible and I decided to take the plunge.

I couldn’t believe how difficult it was to find large bunny chocolate molds at this time of year!  The local craft stores were a bust but I was able to find a few online.  I ended up ordering a very large one because it was the cutest.  It is unlikely that E will come anywhere close to finishing this bunny, but being the helpful mom that I am, I am willing to step in and assist 🙂

My step-by-step instructions are below.  It was so easy! Seriously, the hardest part was finding a spot in the refrigerator for it to sit while it hardened.  I felt so good about my results that I even made bite-sized easter-themed candies just for fun.  AND I got a little carried away and went all pinterest-y and made E-safe chocolate-covered peanut butter eggs (which need a few tweaks so you’ll have to wait a bit for my post about them)!  One of the things I was most concerned about was the texture.  I was afraid that the chocolate would turn out rock-hard.  But they are really perfect, the texture and consistency is just like any store-bought candy.  I think the oil might be the key (but I won’t pretend to be an expert). I really couldn’t be happier with the end result!

small candy

Chocolate Easter Candy – Dairy-Free, Soy-Free, Egg-Free, Peanut-Free, Nut-Free

Ingredients:

10 oz bag Enjoy Life Mini Chips

1 Tbsp Canola Oil (I’m pretty sure any safe oil would work)

Directions:

1. Mix the chips and the oil in a microwave-safe bowl

2. Melt the chips in the microwave on high for about 1.5 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds.  At the end of the minute and a half, the bowl of chips didn’t look smooth, but once I started stirring it they continued to melt enough that I didn’t need to heat them anymore.

3. Poor the melted chocolate into a mold.

4. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes, until solid.  (15 minutes wasn’t enough for my mold so I left in the fridge and then got distracted.  It was in there well over an hour and it was fine.)

5. Turn the mold upside down to pop out the chocolate.

6. Marvel at how easy it was to uphold an Easter traditional in a completely easy and FPIES-safe way

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UPDATE: Two days after I made the candy I noticed that it is starting to get a little discolored.  Some quick internet research suggested that this is probably because it was exposed to changes in humidity or temperature.  There also seems to be some debate about where to let the chocolate harden (room temperature vs refrigerator vs freezer).  My mold directed me to use the refrigerator, which I did, but you might want to experiment with where is best for you.  I think I’ll aim to make the chocolate the day before I need it next time, which is fine because it so easy!  Let us know if you have any tips or hints.  Have fun!

 

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Happy Half-Birthday E!

birthday bananas

Today is E’s half birthday – I can’t believe my baby is already 18 months old!  I have so much to tell you about the past 18 months, but I want to take the opportunity today to focus on one of my favorite days – E’s first birthday.  His first birthday cake was also my first big allergen-free experiment and the recipe that is most often requested by my family and friends, so it is the first one that I wanted to post.  Enjoy!

Like all parents, we couldn’t wait to celebrate E’s first year with our family and friends.  Of course it was also important to us that we got to enjoy the celebration.  Parties are one of the most stressful parts of being a food allergy parent.  It seems that dangers are everywhere and you have to be constantly vigilant – always ready to step in and prevent your child from reaching for an allergen, or stop a friend from sharing food, or even to hand a baby wipe to someone with cheesy hands who is about to squeeze the world’s most squeezable cheeks.  Parties are generally exhausting events during which I have very little fun.  I couldn’t wait for an E-safe party and the chance to relax a little.

At the time we still didn’t have a great handle on E’s allergies.  We had several safe fruits and vegetables but we were avoiding grains and meats.  We weren’t sure about soy so we were avoiding soy protein, but not soy oil or soy lecithin.  Our biggest stressor was dairy because the scratch test was still positive for an IgE allergy to dairy (indicating a high chance of anaphylaxis).  We weren’t really concerned about him eating anything on the menu – it was still easy enough to feed him his safe foods without him being too interested in other options.  However, we worried about accidental exposure to dairy.  We decided to have a completely dairy-free party but not drive ourselves (and our guests) crazy by avoiding all possible allergens.

The major exception was the cake, which we were hoping he would not only eat, but devour (preferably in an amusingly messy and photogenic kind of way).

In my quest to deliver a “normal” childhood, I was determined to find a safe cake recipe that would also taste good.  I’m sure you can imagine – finding a dairy-free, grain free birthday cake is not an easy task.  After much research I decided that coconut flour was my best bet.  I found a recipe that was good, but my technique wasn’t great and I wanted it to be a little more like a traditional yellow cake.  I spent several weeks researching tips for working with coconut flour and tweaking the recipe until my husband (my most honest taste-tester) and I were happy with the outcome.  We ate a lot of cupcakes in August!

Birthday cake

We then needed to do a full food trial in the week leading up to his birthday.  (We didn’t want any surprises on the big day and there were some new ingredients in the cake).  E was probably one of the only kids tired of the taste of cake by the time he made it to his first birthday.  We tested only the cupcake without the frosting and took a chance on the frosting on the big day.  Luckily we didn’t have any reactions…except for a little bit of a sugar high 🙂 .  I was pleased with the end result and he seemed to enjoy himself – I hope you do too.

Eating Birthday Cake

Dairy-Free Coconut Flour Cupcakes

Ingredients

•   12 egg whites

•   10 egg yolks

•   2 cups coconut milk

•  3/4 cup sugar

•  1/3 cup applesauce

•  3 tsp vanilla extract

•  1 ½ cups coconut flour, sifted

•  1/2 tsp baking soda

•  1/4 tsp unrefined sea salt

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

2. Beat the egg whites and yolks (I used the kitchen aid whisk attachment)

3. Slowly add the coconut milk and vanilla extract and continue to beat until smooth, creamy and uniform in both color and texture.

4. Add the sugar and applesauce

5. Switch to Kitchen Aid paddle attachment

6. Slowly add coconut flour, baking soda and unrefined sea salt into the mixture and continue to mix until a  smooth batter forms.

7.  Let batter sit for about 15 minutes

8.  Pour the cake batter into baking cups shaking them to even out the batter and smoothing it with the back of a spoon (If making a cake, use a greased and floured pan).

9. Bake (350 degrees) for about 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the cake’s center comes out clean.  (A cake takes about 40 minutes)

10. Allow the cake to cool completely before removing from the tin and frosting

Birthday Cake CLose

Note: Since his birthday, E has reacted to egg and coconut! This means that birthday number 2 will have its own challenges but luckily we’ve added some safe grains (like wheat and barley!)

The original recipe that I used for inspiration is here: http://nourishedkitchen.com/coconut-flour-cake/